TBR Book-Tag

For various reasons, but largely because of time and trying to do too much, and because I’m lazy, my Library is making its way into the Cocoary.

I used to talk books here, occasionally, and then, just over a year ago, I decided to create a book-space and focus more on Life and Crafts here. Now, though, as a result of much soul-searching and discussions about the future, my books are returning here. For those who did find the Library, you may recognise some of the content, as I transfer the books. I shall endeavour to break the old up with new as I go.

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A portion of our book-collection…

However, I thought, to begin, I should start with my To-Be-Read pile:

1. How do you keep track of your TBR pile?

Physically, I have a small pile of books by my bed, and I have a good memory for my books, bookshelves, and those I have already read. Otherwise, I have a very long list of titles spanning several dozen pages of those I’d like to read.

2. Is your TBR mostly print or e-book?

Print. My Kindle has been neglected for…oh, pretty much since I got it. It has its moments, but I prefer print books.

3. How do you determine which book from your TBR to read next?

Does it need to go back to the library soon? If there are no library books in the pile, how am I feeling? Which looks the most interesting or entertaining?

4. Book that has been on your TBR the longest?

I can’t remember the title – something like Under the Sky, can’t remember the author (Harris, maybe? Barry? Radcliffe?) – but I was given it for my birthday as a teenager, and I still haven’t read it…I can picture both the cover and where it is on my shelf, and I know it has something to do with WWII.

5. A book you recently added to your TBR?

To the pile: Mark’s Warhammer novels. Does that count? There’s quite a few of them, and the collection is growing…

To the list: Black City Saint, by Richard A. Kraal.

6. A book on your TBR strictly because of its beautiful cover?

 The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry, in the Waterstones edition. So pretty! I read The Watchmaker of Filigree Street because of its cover too, and enjoyed it. Sometimes, you can judge a book by its cover…

7. A book on your TBR that you never plan on reading?

The rest of Trollope’s Barchester Chronicles. I read the first, doubt I’ll read the rest. And I doubt I’ll ever read the aforementioned war book…

8. An unpublished book on your TBR that you’re excited for?

Probably the next Cormoran Strike novel, although that isn’t specifically on my list. I don’t know which on my list are unpublished. That’s the thing with working in the book-industry. I come across all sorts of books but don’t very often pay attention to the publication date.

9. A book on your TBR that everyone recommends to you?

Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series. Although I am slowly working my way through them. I’ve had a lack of recommendations recently, though, and I don’t keep up with current bestsellers – see below.

10. A book on your TBR that everyone has read but you?

Probably most of the current bestsellers. I haven’t yet read the Peculiar Orphanage series – Ransom Riggs, is it?

11. A book on your TBR that you’re dying to read?

Can’t think of one – such an emotion about a book only really occurs with series, and I’m not currently in the middle of one. Unless you count the Strike novels? But I can wait for that one.

12. How many books are in your Goodreads TBR shelf?

No idea. My Goodreads bookshelf, like my Kindle, has been neglected since shortly after opening the account… I know, I’m terrible with technology.

 

If you feel inclined to answer the above questions yourself, consider yourself tagged.

 

 

 

A House Without Books

According to American politician and educational reformer Horace Mann, a house without books is like a room without windows. (The rest of that quotation makes me suspect that he would cry child abuse at any parent without books in the house.)

To the Roman politician Marcus Tullius Cicero, it was even more dire, comparing a book-less room to a body without a soul.

Not everyone is in the fortunate position of having books in every room, but I do agree with Mann: every house should have books. It’s no secret that I’m a bookish sort of a person; if I could, I would have bookshelves on every wall, and when I win the lottery, my house will have a proper library. I am very attached to my books. I have to really dislike a book to banish it from my collection.

Tomorrow is National Library Day. It’s supposed to encourage people to join their local libraries and support them against local council cuts. I agree, I haven’t heard of it before, either. But I think it’s a good idea.

For those who can’t afford new books, for those who haven’t the space to keep vast numbers of books, for those who simply like books, the local library is an excellent resource. It’s usually free to join, and you have access to the entire collection, and they can generally order in any specific book you want but which isn’t on their shelves. You can try out new authors without having to actually buy a book you’re not sure about. And being a member of the library gives you access to their online resources as well, including that wonder of wonders the OED Online.

Now I’ll admit, me trying to keep all the libraries open isn’t entirely altruistic. Don’t get me wrong, I think everyone needs such an access to books, but there’s something else. You see, I collect library cards. Wherever I live, I join the local library service. One day, I’d like to be able to create a map of the UK in library cards. But mostly, I just like having library cards.

Library Cards

Lost for Words: Fire-Flaught

The internet is a many-coloured thing, with lots of wonderful resources. Is there anything more useful than knowledge at one’s fingertips?

I like knowing things. Nothing specific, just things. Lots of things. Random things. Obscure things. Details.

But of all the resources the internet has to offer me, one of my very favourites is the OED Online. For those who don’t know the OED – basically, I like reading a dictionary. But not just any dictionary. The Oxford English Dictionary.

The reason I like the OED so much is that it doesn’t just tell me what a word means. It tells me how the word joined the English language and how long ago. It tells me who has used the word, and when, and in what context. It tells me the history of the word, and its spelling variations.

And I am incredibly grateful that my (several) library cards grant me free access to this wonderful resource. Sadly, at about 26 volumes and around £1K, I cannot afford the space or money for the paper copy, much as I would love one. And yes, I collect library cards. One day I would like to have joined every public library service in the UK (a bit ambitious the way governments like to close them, but I can dream).

Anyway, the reason I mention all this is because I thought it would be fun to share words. I like words and languages (although I’m not generally very good at speaking them).

My chosen word today is the noun  Fire-Flaught, which is a flash of lightning in the Scottish/N. English dialect. Apparently it was used interchangeably with fire-slaught by some authors, which is the older of the two, but that is now rare (interestingly, though, the most recent citation the OED has of it is 1999, whereas fire-flaught was most recently used in 1996).

The origins of fire-flaught seem distinctly Germanic, with fire having many cognates in the dead languages of the Dutch and North German tribes, and flaught  probably having roots in the Old English and Norse words for ‘flaying’.

I quite like the image of a lightning bolt as flaying the earth with fire.

Which words do you like?

Go Set a Watchman

I had a plan, a schedule, for Taking My Blog Seriously in the Grand Scheme of retiring from the Real World into my own, where I might live in peace with my threads and my pens for stitching and writing. I planned a blog-schedule for posts over a two-week period; it was all set down in black-and-white in my notebook and diary.

But I have only to write my plan down to feel that it has happened and is done, and for me to lose all interest. So I’m going to rethink the best way for Taking My Blog Seriously.

And in the meantime, today, I shall talk a little about Go Set a Watchman, the controversial novel by Harper Lee.

Let me start by saying that not even studying To Kill a Mockingbird to within an inch of its life could make me hate it. I have always adored Scout, and it is a powerful story, probably made all the more so because of Scout’s age. Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings and all that.

Go Set a Watchman is, I would say, a companion novel, not a sequel. And I would probably not suggest reading them in quick succession. As Scout discovered, a little distance is needed to cope with the more unpalatable side of Atticus Finch. It is, though, quite nice to discover that he isn’t the paragon Scout thinks him in Mockingbird.

Given all the media attention and spoilers, I hope I don’t upset anyone with the revelation that Atticus was a member of the KKK. Please don’t think too harshly of him: he had his reasons. And Scout’s reaction when she learns of this is just what we might expect of her. She is, in Watchman, still the same old Scout. Older, a little sadder, maybe, but still as tomboyish and impetuous as ever. And still winding Aunt Alex up by not behaving like a Southern lady.

Watchman is not Mockingbird, though, but it’ll be interesting to reread Mockingbird in the light of Watchman’s revelations. It’s interesting to see how Mockingbird evolved, given that Watchman was written first, although the fates of some of the characters was rather upsetting.

As to Scout’s fate, I really hope she resists the hero provided in Watchman and goes off to find Dill: I’ve always thought they’d make a good couple.