Fudge Off Part Two: Black Forest Fudge

This is a more traditional sort of fudge, made by carefully boiling the ingredients to a specific temperature. Usually this takes ages. Or it seems to anyway – watched pots and all that. Unfortunately, you can’t really go away and come back again, just in case it gets too hot.

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So, once the sugar-cream-butter mix has dissolved and reached the required 113C (and I’m not sure whether I prefer my digital sugar thermometer which I have to hold steadily in the middle of the mix or my mother’s mercury filled one which she uses for jam and clips happily to the edge of the pan), it gets split into two. One half has dark chocolate added, the other gets white chocolate.

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Once the chocolate has melted, the dark mix is poured onto the (this time) foil covered tray. Some cherries are liberally strewn over the top, before being covered by the white chocolate mix. The rest of the cherries are scattered in a haphazard and carefree manner and the whole is left to set for several hours. Then it gets cut into squares and eaten. Because it’s not there to look pretty.

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Verdict: it’s fudge. Definitely fudge. I think it beats the no-fuss fudge simply because it’s more of a crumbly sort of fudge. And I prefer that sort of fudge.

And now I’m taking a break because of exams. See you on the other side!

Fudge Off Part One: No-Fuss Fudge

Since I have so many recipe books for treats and chocolates, I thought I would test similar recipes to try and find the best recipes. Or the best of the ones which I have in my books. Admittedly this first test isn’t a particularly fair one, since I’m testing a simple fudge against a “proper” fudge (as in, one that needs me to use a sugar thermometer), but that’s part of the point. Do simple fudge recipes hold their own against traditional fudges?

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So first of all, having made sure I have condensed, not evaporated, milk, I pour and splosh the milk, chocolate and butter into a pan to melt together over hot water. As I said, it’s a simple recipe. It calls itself “Chocolate Sort-of-no-Cook Fudge”. It comes from Miss Hope’s recipe book, as will the recipe for Part Two. It’s the sort of recipe you can use with children, since it is just about melting and mixing, and you don’t have to watch the mercury rise with an eagle eye. It is, in fact, very simple.

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The last time I made one of these simple fudges I stored the recipe away under “Fudge Icing”. It didn’t set, you see. Not even with considerably more chocolate than the pound the recipe had wanted. It just didn’t work. So I’m largely sceptical about simple fudge recipes. But we shall see.

Once it’s all melted together and smooth, it gets poured out onto a tin covered in cling film; I couldn’t find either baking paper or tin foil.

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I changed the suggested Smarties topping to chopped nuts, because they’re what I had in the cupboard, and I wasn’t making these with children. I think even Willy Wonka drew the line at using children in his recipes.

Verdict: This isn’t a crumbly fudge recipe, but they are very moreish. A bit like a soft toffee caramel. Definitely a recipe for when you want fudge now. Well, in about an hour, depending on where you leave them to set.