VCT: Types of Chocolate

There’s more to chocolate than Dark, Milk, White. In fact, some countries (naming no names, but a lot of mainland Europe) don’t even recognise White chocolate as chocolate. No cacao liquor (solids), you see. White chocolate is sweetened cacao butter.

But this isn’t what I’m talking about. Chocolate is made from the bean of the cacao tree, and there’s more than one variety of cacao tree.

The most common bean, which accounts for about 80-90% of cacao production, is the Forastero. Least common is the Criollo bean, which is considered a delicacy probably because of its scarcity. In between the two is a hybrid, the Trinitario, which was created when Trinidad’s criollo population was almost destroyed by storms.

The criollo trees have the disadvantage of lower yields and being more susceptible to disease, which makes it an impractical sort of tree from a business point-of-view. I’m hoping to come across some criollo chocolate in my travels. Having said that, I appear to have Peruvian criollo cacao liquor on my eBay watch-list. Perhaps I’ll make my own.

The Trinitario tree has higher yields than the criollo, and is more resistant to disease, and is considered to be a better quality bean than the Forastero. It has, however, a limited reach, being grown in few cacao-producing countries – Trinidad, Venezuala and Columbia. This I do not have on my eBay watch-list, so I might have to try harder to find some on my Tour.

And then we come to the Forastero. Which is pretty much every chocolate bar out there. I’m guessing differences in flavour will come about from other influences on the tree as it grows, from its environment. Like honey tasting of the flowers the bees took nectar from.

And since white chocolate doesn’t contain cacao solids, I shan’t, often, be tasting it on my Tour. My aim is to taste the darker chocolates, but I know I have a Ghanian milk chocolate lined up. I hope to find a range of each single-origin, but this may not always be possible. At least, not all at the same time for comparison.

 

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